“A woman only wears makeup for those who appreciate her.”

为了越来越好地从信息视角学习罗马尼亚语翻译,同期也让作为全职老妈的投机接受更加多音信,与外场保持联通,几近期订阅了ChinaDaily
手提式有线电话机报。

The Caliph, Cupid and the Clock by O. Henry

“女为悦己者容。”

记笔记并加以运用是让鲜活的文化在脑际里保鲜越来越久的不二法诀。因而,笔者在读书的还要,习于旧贯画一画,记一记,提炼当中的精彩。

21 April, 2017We present the short story “The Caliph, Cupid and the
Clock” by O. Henry. The story was originally adapted and recorded by the
U.S. Department of State.

It is ancient saying from the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD) that has been
ingrained in Chinese people’s minds for generations.

好能源大家享。为了在利己的同不平日候也让越多斯拉维尼亚语爱好者吸取胡萝卜素,今后将不定期推动手提式无线电话机报笔记。

Prince Michael of Valleluna sat in the park on the seat he liked
best. In the coolness of the night, he felt full of life. The other
seats were not filled. Cool weather sends most people home.
The moon was rising over the houses on the east side of the park.
Children laughed and played. Music came softly from one of the nearer
streets. Around the little park, cabs rolled by. The trains that
traveled high above the street rushed past. These cabs and trains, with
their wild noises, seemed like animals outside the park. But they could
not enter. The park was safe and quiet. And above the trees was the
great, round, shining face of a lighted clock in a tall old building.
Prince Michael’s shoes were old and broken. No shoemaker could ever make
them like new again. His clothes were very torn. The hair of his face
had been growing for two weeks. It was all colors—gray and brown and red
and green-yellow. His hat was older and more torn than his shoes and his
other clothes.
Prince Michael sat on the seat he liked best, and he smiled. It was a
happy thought to him that he had enough money to buy every house he
could see near the park, if he wished. He had as much gold as any rich
man in this proud city of New York. He had as many jewels, and houses,
and land. He could have sat at table with kings and queens. All the best
things in the world could be his—art, pleasure, beautiful women, honor.
All the sweeter things in life were waiting for Prince Michael of
Valleluna whenever he might choose to take them. But instead he was
choosing to sit in torn clothes on a seat in a park.
For he had tasted of the fruit the tree of life. He had not liked the
taste. Here, in this park, he felt near to the beating heart of the
world. He hoped it would help him to forget that taste.
These thoughts moved like a dream through the mind of Prince Michael.
There was a smile across his face with its many-colored hair. Sitting
like this, in torn clothes, he loved to study other men. He loved to do
good things for others. Giving was more pleasant to him than owning all
his riches. It was his chief pleasure to help people who were in
trouble. He liked to give to people who needed help. He liked to
surprise them with princely gifts. But he always gave wisely, after
careful thought.
And now, as he looked at the shining face of the great clock, his smile
changed. The Prince always thought big thoughts. When he thought of
time, he always felt a touch of sadness. Time controlled the world.
People had to do what time commanded. Their comings and goings were
always controlled by a clock. They were always in a hurry, and always
afraid, because of time. It made him sad.
After a little while, a young man in evening clothes came and sat upon a
seat near the Prince. For half an hour he sat there nervously. Then
he began to watch the face of the lighted clock above the trees. The
Prince could see that the young man had a trouble. He could also see
that somehow the clock was part of the trouble.
The Prince rose and went to the young man’s seat.
“I am a stranger, and I shouldn’t speak to you,” he said. “But I can see
that you are troubled. I am Prince Michael of Valleluna. I do not want
people to know who I am. That is why I wear these torn clothes. It is a
small pleasure of mine to help those who need help. First I must feel
sure they are worth helping. I think you are. And perhaps your trouble
may be ended if you and I together decide what to do about it.”
The young man looked up brightly at the Prince. Brightly, but he was
still troubled. He laughed, then, but still the look of trouble
remained. But he accepted this chance to talk to someone.
“I’m glad to meet you, Prince,” he said pleasantly. “Yes, I can see
you don’t want to be known. That’s easy to see. Thanks for your offer to
help. But I don’t see what you can do. It’s my own problem. But
thanks.”
Prince Michael sat down at the young man’s side. People often said no to
him, but they always said it pleasantly.
“Clocks,” said the Prince, “are tied to the feet of all men and women. I
have seen you watching that clock. That face commands us to act, whether
or not we wish to act. Let me tell you not to trust the numbers on that
face. They will destroy you if they can. Stop looking at that clock.
What does it know about living men and women?”
“I usually don’t look at that clock,” said the young man. “I carry a
watch, except when I wear evening clothes.”
“I know men and women as I know the trees and the flowers,” said the
Prince, warmly and proudly. “I have studied many years. And I am very
rich. There are few troubles that I cannot help. I have read what is in
your face. I have found honor and goodness there, and trouble. Please
accept my help. I can see that you are wise. Show how wise you are. Do
not judge me by my torn clothes. I am sure I can help you.”
The young man looked at the clock again, and his face grew darker. Then
he looked at a house beside the park. Lights could be seen in many
rooms.
“Ten minutes before nine!” said the young man. He raised his hands and
then let them fall, as if hope had gone. He stood up and took a quick
step or two away.
“Remain!” commanded Prince Michael. His voice was so powerful that the
young man turned quickly. He laughed a little.
“I’ll wait ten minutes and then I’ll go,” he said in a low voice, as if
only to himself. Then to the Prince he said, “I’ll join you. We’ll
destroy all the clocks. And women, too.”
“Sit down,” said the Prince softly. “I do not accept that. I do not
include women. Women are enemies of clocks. They are born that way.
Therefore they are friends of those who wish to destroy clocks. If you
can trust me, tell me your story.”
The young man sat down again and laughed loudly.
“Prince, I will,” he said. He did not believe that Prince Michael was
really a prince. His manner of speaking proved that. “Do you see that
house, Prince? That house with lights in three windows on the third
floor? At six tonight I was in that house with the young lady I am going
to—was going to marry. I’d been doing wrong, my dear Prince, and she
heard about it. I was sorry. I wanted her to forget it. We are always
asking women to forget things like that, aren’t we, Prince?
” ‘I want time to think,’ she said. ‘I will either forget it forever, or
never see your face again. At half-past eight,’ she said, ‘watch the
middle window on the third floor of this house. If I decide to forget, I
will hang out a long white cloth. You will know then that everything is
as it was before. And you may come to me. If you see nothing hanging
from the window, you will know that everything between us is finished
forever.’
“That,” said the young man, “is why I have been watching that clock. The
time was passed twenty-three minutes ago. Do you see why I am a little
troubled, my torn Prince?”
“Let me tell you again,” said Prince Michael in his soft voice, “that
women are the born enemies of clocks. Clocks are bad, women are good.
The white cloth may yet appear.”
“Never!” said the young man, hopelessly. “You don’t know Marian. She
is always on time, to the minute. That was the first thing I liked about
her. At 8:31, I should have known that everything was finished. I’m
going to go West. I’ll get on the train tonight. I’ll find some way to
forget her. Good night—Prince.”
Prince Michael smiled his gentle, understanding smile. He caught the
other’s arm. The bright light in the Prince’s eyes was softening. It was
dream-like, clouded.
“Wait,” he said, “till the clock tells the hour. I have riches and power
and I am wiser than most men. But when I hear the clock tell the hour, I
am afraid. Stay with me till then. This woman shall be yours. You have
the promise of the Prince of Valleluna. On the day you are married I
will give you $100,000 and a great house beside the Hudson River. But
there must be no clocks in that house. Do you agree to that?”
“Sure,” said the young man. “I don’t like clocks.”
He looked again at the clock above the trees. It was three minutes
before nine.
“I think,” said Prince Michael, “that I will sleep a little. It has been
a long day.”
He lay down on the seat, as if he had often done it before.
“You’ll find me on this park on any evening when the weather is good,”
said the Prince. “Come to me when you know the day you’ll be married.
I’ll give you the money.”
“Thanks, Prince,” said the young man. “That day isn’t going to come. But
thanks.”
Prince Michael fell into a deep sleep. His hat rolled on the ground. The
young man lifted it, placed it over the Prince’s face, and moved one of
the Prince’s legs into an easier position. “Poor fellow!” he said. He
pulled the torn coat together over the Prince’s body.
It was nine. Loud and surprising came the voice of the clock, telling
the hour. The young man took a deep breath, and turned for one more look
at the house. And he gave a shout of joy.
From the middle window on the third floor, a snow-white wonderful cloth
was hanging.
Through the park a man came, hurrying home.
“Will you tell me the time, please?” asked the young man.
The other man took out his watch. “Twenty-nine and a half minutes after
eight.”
And then he looked up at the clock.
“But that clock is wrong!” the man said. “The first time in ten years!
My watch is always—”
But he was talking to no one. He turned and saw the young man running
toward the house with three lighted windows on the third floor.
And in the morning two cops walked through the park. There was only
one person to be seen—a man, asleep on a long park seat. They stopped to
look at him.
“It’s Michael the Dreamer,” said one. “He has been sleeping like this in
the park for twenty years. He won’t live much longer, I guess.”
The other cop looked at something in the sleeper’s hand. “Look at this,”
he said. “Fifty dollars. I wish I could have a dream like that.”
And then they gave Prince Michael of Valleluna a hard shake, and brought
him out of his dreams and into real life.
Download activities to help you understand this story
here.

Now it’s your turn to use the words in this story. Do you feel that you
are often in a hurry? How often do you stop to enjoy the world around
you? Let us know in the comments section or on
51VOA.COM.

那句老话从宋代(公元前206年至公元220年)流传到现在,早已在华夏人的构思中逐步。

以下为二零一八年七月三日早报中国和英国双语精湛。


In ancient China, the styles and colors of women’s clothes were often
connected with men’s taste.

一.【霍金逝世】

****Words in This Story****
prince n. a male member of a royal family
cab(s) – n. a car that carries passengers to a place for an
amount of money that is based on the distance traveled
beatingv. to make the regular movements needed to pump blood
comings and goingsidm. the activity of people arriving at and
leaving a place
nervouslyadv. done in a way showing feelings of being worried
and afraid about what might happen
pleasantly adv. done in a way that is friendly and likable
hopelesslyadv. done in a way that shows no feeling of hope
cop(s) – n. a person whose job is to enforce laws, investigate
crimes, and make arrests

在西汉华夏,女人服装的样式和颜料常常是由男子的尝尝决定的。

1. 著名物医学家霍金病逝

Emperors’ personal choices largely decided what would be fashionable. If
the clothes, makeup or hairstyle of a concubine got special appreciation
from an emperor, her style would be a trend that was followed by both
the noble and common women.

Stephen Hawking dies aged 76

皇帝的民用审美非常的大程度上调控了时髦的动向。借使多个妃嫔的行头、妆容和发型特别讨太岁欢心,那么他的美发就能够化为时髦,受到贵族和平民女子的追捧。

注:那是音信标题,因而句末不加标点。

Sometimes, the makeup and dress styles of popular prostitutes also
influenced the nobles and royals.

语言点:sb dies aged XX,表示“某一个人过逝,享年XX岁”。也得以写成,sb passes
away at the age of XX。

有的时候,名妓的妆容和发型也会听得多了自然能详细说出来皇亲贵族的审美。

2. 英帝国物文学家、《时间简史》笔者斯蒂芬·霍金(见图)归西,享年柒拾七虚岁。

Nowadays, clothes are more like a way to show the wearer’s taste and
character.

Stephen Hawking(see photo), the British physicist and author of “A Brief
History of Time”, has passed away at the age of 76. 

今昔,着装越多是一种展现穿衣者品味和本性的点子。

注:see photo 能够一贯用 pictured 取代。BBC Breaking News
前些天关于霍金逝世的一篇报导中正是这么应用的,如:

To a large number of Chinese women who are “working girls” and “working
mothers”, dressing up for men has become an old story.

As he was preparing to marry his first wife Jane (pictured), doctors
predicted he did not have longto live.

对于大多数中华“专门的工作女人”或“职场母亲”来说,“女为悦己者容”已经变为历史。

皇家88平台 1

However, not all of them think the same way.

BBC新闻插图

不过,不是享有女子都以那般以为的。

3.她曾说过:’假诺宇宙不是您所爱之人的家中,那它也可是那样

Recently, a fashion trend named “easy to get married” style has sparked
a series of debates on the internet since November.

It would not be much of a universe if it wasn’t home to the people
you love.

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